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It is acknowledged that music plays a crucial role in our lives as it is the language of the human soul and linguistically neutral. Some people believe that music can bridge various cultures and generation gaps. While I consider that musical compositions, lyrics of many songs seem to be loved by people worldwide, I disagree with those advocating that music helps bring different ages together. 

On the one hand, it is understandable why the community thinks that music overcomes hurdles among various nations and cultures. The key rationale in favor of this view is that most music listeners enjoy instrumental compositions from all parts of the world. Music speaks the same language, which embodies a range of emotions such as happiness, sorrows, or love. It is not necessary to interpret or understand entire lyrics as it touches our hearts, and resonates in our mind. No matter what language we speak and understand, we enjoy the melody and depth of music rather than its meaning, which is the reason why people in all corners of the world can love the same song or singer. Consequently, the geographical distance among different nations seems to be intangible when we have the same strong feelings. 

On the other hand, I don’t completely side with those who believe music is an effective way to bridge the generation gaps. First, the musical taste of particular individuals, especially youngsters and elders is considerably different. For example, while many young people prefer listening to pop music or rap songs, most elderly people complain about this taste, instead, they enjoy songs having traditional tunes, positive and motivational meanings. Second, psychologically, the elderly are fond of the nostalgic feel of songs released years ago which were prominent in the past, modern music genres are likely to be favored popularly by youngsters, however. 

In conclusion, although music can remove the language barrier and it can act as a powerful means of uniting people of different cultures in general, I would argue that it may accidentally increase gaps between young and old people due to differences in musical preference. 


 

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